Martin Scorcese

About Martin Scorcese

Martin Charles Scorsese (born November 17, 1942) is an American film director, producer, screenwriter, and actor. One of the major figures of the New Hollywood era, he is widely regarded as one of the greatest and most influential directors in film history. Scorsese’s body of work explores themes such as Italian-American identity, Catholic concepts of guilt and redemption, faith, machismo, nihilism, crime and sectarianism. Scorsese has also dedicated his life to film preservation and film restoration by founding the nonprofit organization ‘The Film Foundation’ in 1990, as well as the ‘World Cinema Foundation’ in 2007 and the ‘African Film Heritage Project’ in 2017.

In 1971 Scorsese moved to Hollywood, where he associated with some of the young directors who defined the decade, including Steven Spielberg, Francis Ford Coppola, Brian De Palma, and George Lucas. He has established a filmmaking history involving repeat collaborations with well-renown actors, such as Leonardo Di Caprio, Robert De Niro and Thelma Schoonmaker.

Martin Scorcese has directed, produced and written an impressive repertoire of feature films and documentaries, featuring titles like ‘New York, New York’, ‘Goodfellas’, ‘Gangs of New York’, ‘Shutter Island’, ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’, ‘The Irishman’ and ‘The 50 Year Argument’. Scorsese’s productions have consistently garnered critical acclaim, with nine nominations for the Academy Award for Best Director, he is the most-nominated living director and is second only to William Wyler’s twelve nominations overall. In 2007, Scorsese was presented with the Kennedy Center Honor for his influence in American culture, and five of his films have been inducted into the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant”. Learn More…

Martin Scorcese